Daniel defoe a collection of critical essays


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Preview — Daniel Defoe by Max Byrd. Daniel Defoe creator of everyone's childhood favourite, "Robinson Crusoe," is also an important pioneer of the development of the English novel.

Daniel Defoe

In this volume, such noted critics as Ian Watt, Virgina Woolf, Mark Schorer, and Martin Price examine Defoe's major novels, explaining their aesthetic values and clarifying their significance both in the eighteenth cent Daniel Defoe creator of everyone's childhood favourite, "Robinson Crusoe," is also an important pioneer of the development of the English novel.

In this volume, such noted critics as Ian Watt, Virgina Woolf, Mark Schorer, and Martin Price examine Defoe's major novels, explaining their aesthetic values and clarifying their significance both in the eighteenth century and for readers today. Get A Copy. Hardcover , First , pages. More Details Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

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Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. This is a very useful set of essays. I took graduate courses from the editor. Max Byrd lives in Davis, California. Here the reader finds Defoe using a sophisticated narrative situation as the older Crusoe recounts—and comments on—the spiritual states of the young Crusoe. Perhaps Crusoe is most appealing when he is aware of his own foibles—for example, when he prides himself on building a gigantic canoe only to find that he cannot possibly transport it to water. When he becomes an overseer in Virginia, for example, he finds that he cannot whip his slaves because the action hurts his arms.

Instead, he tells the slaves they will be severely punished by an absentee master and then pretends to have solicited their pardon. Grateful for this mercy, the slaves then work for Jack willingly and cheerfully. It is method rather than mercy that triumphs here. The confusion in Captain Singleton and Colonel Jack between expediency and morality can also be found in Moll Flanders and, to a lesser extent, in Roxana. What makes these latter novels enduring is the power of their central characters.

Although Moll can occasionally rejoice when a criminal cohort capable of exposing her is hanged, she feels only horror when she contemplates murdering a child from whom she steals a necklace.

If Defoe begins to solve the thematic problems of his earlier novels in Moll Flanders and Roxana , he does so through fairly dissimilar characters. When she meets a man at Bartholomew Fair who is intoxicated, she has sex with him and then robs him.

Within a few pages, however, she has found the man again and taken him as her lover, a relationship that lasts for several years. Moll seems to see no conflicts in her attitudes. Her speech also shows her ability to rationalize moral problems, and she often uses a type of equivocation that allows her to justify her own actions.

When a thief is pursued through a crowd of people, he throws his bundle of stolen goods to Moll. Contrary to the character of Moll, Roxana recognizes her failings.

Biography of Daniel Defoe

After her first husband leaves her in poverty, her landlord offers to become her lover. Although he has a wife from whom he is separated, he argues that he will treat Roxana in every way as his legal wife. Throughout their life together, Roxana distinguishes between their degrees of guilt: The landlord, she says, has convinced himself that their relationship is moral; she, however, knows that it is not and is thus the greater sinner. Indeed, Roxana is portrayed in much greater psychological depth than is Moll; one measure of this is the relationship between Roxana and her maid, Amy.

Heath in A Journal of the Plague Year —it is only in Roxana that the friend appears in the novel from the beginning to the end and provides an alter ego for the main character.

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When Roxana is deciding whether to take the landlord as her lover, for example, Amy volunteers several times to sleep with him if Roxana refuses. The logical question is why Roxana does this destructive deed, and the answer seems to be that, since she herself feels intense guilt at sleeping with the landlord, she wants to degrade Amy and the landlord as well. Amy, similarly manipulative, is less passive than Roxana. Amy, perhaps, acts out the desires that Roxana will not admit, even to herself.

In fact, both Moll Flanders and Roxana seem to hint at an irrational perverseness in their characters that explains, in part, their crimes. At one point after beginning her life as a thief, Moll actually tries to earn her living with her needle and admits that she can do so, but temptation makes her return to crime.

She appears to enjoy living outside the law, no matter how much she may talk of her fears of Newgate Prison. Similarly, she once steals a horse simply because it is there; she has no way to dispose of it, but the irrational impulse in her that leads her to crime causes her to commit the theft anyway.

Defoe is not given to high comedy, but the picture of Moll leading the horse through the streets, wondering how she is ever going to rid herself of it, is a memorably comic scene.

Analysis of Daniel Defoe's Novels | Literary Theory and Criticism

About halfway through the novel, for example, she meets a Dutch merchant who helps her out of some difficulties; she has sex with him, but when he proposes marriage she refuses him on the grounds that marriage is a kind of slavery for women. Actually, she fears that he is trying to take over her fortune. When he answers this unspoken objection, promising not to touch her wealth, she is left in the uncomfortable position of having to admit that her initial reluctance was based solely on financial considerations or else continue her spirited defense of female freedom. She chooses the latter option, arguing until the merchant admits defeat.

In these two novels, Defoe seems to be exploring the nature of evil, and it is seen repeatedly as an irrational drive that can deprive its victims of free choice. Although Moll Flanders touches on incest, madness, and murder, these seem to be the understandable results of understandable causes: If you do not know your mother, you may marry your brother; if your brother-husband discovers your identity, he may go mad with grief; if you steal from a child, you may contemplate murder to cover up your crime. In Roxana , however, many of the characters seem motivelessly malignant, obscurely evil.

daniel defoe a collection of critical essays Daniel defoe a collection of critical essays
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daniel defoe a collection of critical essays Daniel defoe a collection of critical essays
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